Archive for the ‘Sleep and Dreams’ Category

October 2nd, 2011 No Comments

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer: #1 eBook for “lucid dreaming” on Amazon.Com Search Results

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer- Kindle Version
The Two Week Lucid Dreamer has gained tremendous popularity on Amazon.Com. As of today, if you do a basic search for “lucid dreaming”, it is now the #1 eBook to show up in the results (#4 overall, behind Robert Waggoner and Stephen LaBerge’s Lucid Dreaming paperbacks). If you do a Kindle Store search for “lucid dreaming”, it is #3 (again behind Robert Waggoner and Stephen Laberge’s eBook versions of their paperbacks). Also, it is listed as #13 most popular book in the Dreams Best Sellers category of Amazon.Com overall, which is quite an achievement considering there are hundreds of other dream-related books it is competing with.

Course Highlights: The Two Week Lucid Dreamer is an accelerated course targeted for lucid dreaming beginners who are looking for the fast-track to dreaming consciously. The course includes eBook with step-by-step instructions on how to dream consciously in two weeks or less. As a bonus, two lucid dreaming induction MP3’s + cheat sheet are included. Additionally, a bonus chapter with advanced techniques is included.

What is lucid dreaming?

Lucid dreaming is being aware you are dreaming while dreaming. For first-time lucid dreamers, this usually happens due to a strange occurrence in the dream, such as flying or seeing a strange creature appear. Some first-time lucid dreamers are able to stay in this dream for a while, but many become disturbed and wake up from the dream.

If you are in a lucid dream, you will usually have some power over your dream- anything from being able to fly or making an object or room appear behind a door or inside a pocket, right up to being able to change into animals and manipulate your dream world. It is like being a director of your own movie. Through dream research, lucid dreams have been scientifically proven to exist.

Why did I create the course?

I have been researching and experimenting with lucid dreaming for the last decade. But I was no natural lucid dreamer. For most of those years, I was only able to have lucid dreams sporadically. It wasn’t until this past year that I perfected my own techniques for consistent lucid dreaming. I read countless books/eBooks on lucid dreaming, dream interpretation, and sleep. I tested many induction techniques and over a dozen dream supplements as well.

What did I find out? Lucid dreaming isn’t rocket science. There are proven techniques out there that anyone can put to use. I use these techniques to have lucid dreams whenever I want, almost every night. This has significantly improved my waking life.

What does the course include?

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer

  • The Two Week Lucid Dreamer eBook- step by step instructions on how to dream consciously in two weeks
  • Kindle Version of eBook- Specially formatted for viewing on the Kindle reader
  • Lucid Dreaming Beginner MP3 with isochronic tones (Binaural Beats) for lucid dream induction
    • This is the latest technology in Brainwave Entrainment
  • Bonus: Advanced Lucid Dreaming Techniques- weeks 3 and 4 include advanced techniques for lucid dreaming
  • Bonus: Lucid Dreaming Advanced MP3 with isochronic tones (Binaural Beats) for lucid dream induction
  • Bonus: Lucid Dreaming Cheat Sheet- keep this near your bed to review before you go to sleep

What can you expect after taking the course?

After you’ve read the manual, followed the daily exercises, listened to the MP3, used the cheat sheet, and followed the techniques persistently, soon enough you will:

  1. Have your first lucid dream. This is an important first step in learning to have lucid dreams on a consistent basis. You will likely be filled with excitement for several days after this, and want to have more lucid dreams.
  1. Begin having lucid dreams more frequently. People usually report having lucid dreams 10-15 times per month at this stage.
  1. Be able to have a lucid dream whenever you want. At this stage, you will be able to tell yourself the night before that you would like to have a lucid dream. And you will have a lucid dream that night, consistently.

In addition to the Kindle version of the course on Amazon.Com, there is a PDF version available on The Two Week Lucid Dreamer website.

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March 11th, 2011 No Comments

Three Easy Steps to Start Lucid Dreaming and Three Common Beginner Mistakes

Lucid dreaming / Lucid dreams / Lucid dream in the sky and the cloudsLucid dreaming is being aware you are dreaming while dreaming. For first-time lucid dreamers, this usually happens due to a strange occurrence in the dream, such as flying or seeing a strange creature appear. Some first-time lucid dreamers are able to stay in this dream for a while, but many become disturbed and wake up from the dream.

If you are in a lucid dream, you will usually have some power over your dream- anything from being able to fly or making an object or room appear behind a door or inside a pocket, right up to being able to change into animals and manipulate your dream world. It is like being a director of your own movie. Through dream research, lucid dreams have been scientifically proven to exist.

Step #1: Improve Your Dream Recall

Go to your local bookstore and buy a nice journal which you will devote solely to capturing your dreams. Also purchase a book light which you can clip on to this journal, and a nice pen. Place your dream journal, pen, and book light close to your bed or under your pillow. Tell yourself that when you wake up the next morning, you will remember your dreams

Make a conscious effort to remember dreams before you go to sleep

As you’re falling asleep, suggest to yourself that you will wake up remembering your dreams. You can use a mantra (such as “I will remember my dreams”). Instead of putting intentional effort into the suggestion, try to genuinely expect to remember your dreams. Just be careful not to put too much intentional effort into the mantra. Instead, try to genuinely expect to remember your dreams.

Upon awakening, stay in bed as long as possible and replay the dream in your mind

It is generally accepted by dream researchers that dreams are not remembered unless the dreamer awakens during a dream. Even after awaking during the dream, it is usually not remembered for long. Therefore, every time you wake up in the night, and the next morning, ask yourself, “What was I just dreaming?”

Stay in the same position and think your dreams over before jumping out of bed. After you have remembered your dream, move to a different position (with your eyes still closed) that you normally sleep in, and try and remember other dreams. The position that you are in may help your brain remember what dream you had while sleeping in that position.

Write about the dream in a dream journal

Capture as much detail as possible, including the estimated time of the dream. If you are too groggy when you awake, just jot down a summary, and try to fill in the gaps the next morning.

Your dream recall will improve with time. Before I started capturing my dreams in a dream journal, I rarely remembered them. After using a dream journal for several weeks, I was remembering at least one dream per night, often 3-4.

Step #2: Perform Reality Checks

Throughout your day (5 to 10 times / day), ask yourself, “Am I dreaming?” Look at something near you in detail, such as your watch. If you are dreaming, your watch will give you two completely different times when you look at it twice. Also, the numbers on your watch may appear blurry, change rapidly, or wiggle if you am in a dream. If you don’t have a watch, look at an object in detail, turn away, and look at it again. Does the object stay constant, or change?

Reality checks help bridge your waking life with your dream life. The habits of thought you have in your dreams are similar to those in your waking life. So by performing reality checks throughout the day, you will start performing this habit in your dreams as well, allowing you to discover you are dreaming.

Make sure you create a habit of performing reality checks in the morning when you wake up. This ensures that you did not have a false awakening (dream where you believe you are awake but are really still dreaming). Here are some reality checks you can perform after waking up:

  • Performing a reality check when you wake up and look at your alarm clock
  • Leaving a note for yourself in the bathroom to ask “Am I dreaming?”
  • When you wake up, look at your reflection in the mirror and make sure it looks normal
  • Perform a reality check when you eat breakfast

Step #3: Recognize the Dream-Like Nature of Life

Tibetan Buddhists have been following this practice since the 8th century as part of Dream Yoga. There is no stronger foundational practice of bringing consistent lucidity to your dream life than by remaining in conscious presence throughout your waking life.

You need to truly recognize the dream-like nature of life until the same recognition begins to manifest in the dream. This practice is even more important than your daily reality checks.

How do you do this recognize the dream-like nature of life?

1. When you wake up, you must think to yourself, “I am awake in a dream.”

2. When you eat breakfast, you must think to yourself, “This is dream food.”

3. You should continue this throughout your day, reminding yourself that “This is all a dream.”

This practice will help you build lucidity into your waking life, and begin to manifest it in your dream life.

Beginner Mistake #1: Trying to induce lucid dreams at bedtime, during N-REM stages of sleep (Non-REM sleep)

Many lucid dreaming beginners attempt lucid dreaming techniques while going to sleep. But research has shown that dreams (both lucid and non-lucid) are much more common during your REM cycle, which first occurs 1-2 hours into your sleep. Dream-initiated and wake-initiated lucid dreams are much more common in the early morning, during your longer REM stages. During the early morning sleep cycles, the REM stage gets progressively longer (up to 45 minutes).

Beginner Mistake #2: Trying to have lucid dreams before mastering dream recall

You should be remembering at least one dream per night, and capturing it in your dream journal, before you attempt lucid dreaming induction techniques.

Beginner Mistake #3: Trying too hard to have lucid dreams

Being relaxed, patient and persistent are critical to mastering lucid dreaming. If you try to hard at the beginning, you will only lose sleep and become frustrated early on. Learn relaxation techniques and practice them before bedtime to increase chances of lucid dream induction.

Learn More

To learn more about lucid dreaming, sign up for your Free Lucid Dreaming Starter Handbook.

This post is part of the Dream Evolver Series

Creative Commons License photo credit: photosteve101

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March 5th, 2011 No Comments

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer eBook Price Cut + Available at Amazon.Com Kindle Store, Nook / Ipad / Sony eReader

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer- Kindle Version
To make my eBook The Two Week Lucid Dreamer available to a wider audience, I’ve cut the price in half to $14.95 on TwoWeekLucidDreamer.Com (includes high-resolution PDF and Kindle version). I’ve also formatted it for the Kindle reader, and am offering a Kindle-only version on Amazon.Com. After testing this out on my Kindle, I can tell you that this version looks great (see image on the right). In addition, I’ve formatted a Nook / Ipad / Sony eReader version on Smashwords.Com. All versions come with all bonus materials: Beginner MP3, Advanced MP3, Cheat Sheet, and Advanced Lucid Dreaming Techniques.

Course Highlights: The Two Week Lucid Dreamer is an accelerated course targeted for lucid dreaming beginners who are looking for the fast-track to dreaming consciously. The course includes eBook with step-by-step instructions on how to dream consciously in two weeks or less. As a bonus, two lucid dreaming induction MP3’s + cheat sheet are included. Additionally, a bonus chapter with advanced techniques is included.

What is lucid dreaming?

Lucid dreaming is being aware you are dreaming while dreaming. For first-time lucid dreamers, this usually happens due to a strange occurrence in the dream, such as flying or seeing a strange creature appear. Some first-time lucid dreamers are able to stay in this dream for a while, but many become disturbed and wake up from the dream.

If you are in a lucid dream, you will usually have some power over your dream- anything from being able to fly or making an object or room appear behind a door or inside a pocket, right up to being able to change into animals and manipulate your dream world. It is like being a director of your own movie. Through dream research, lucid dreams have been scientifically proven to exist.

Why did I create the course?

I have been researching and experimenting with lucid dreaming for the last decade. But I was no natural lucid dreamer. For most of those years, I was only able to have lucid dreams sporadically. It wasn’t until this past year that I perfected my own techniques for consistent lucid dreaming. I read countless books/eBooks on lucid dreaming, dream interpretation, and sleep. I tested many induction techniques and over a dozen dream supplements as well.

What did I find out? Lucid dreaming isn’t rocket science. There are proven techniques out there that anyone can put to use. I use these techniques to have lucid dreams whenever I want, almost every night. This has significantly improved my waking life.

What does the course include?

The Two Week Lucid Dreamer

  • The Two Week Lucid Dreamer eBook- step by step instructions on how to dream consciously in two weeks
  • Kindle Version of eBook- Specially formatted for viewing on the Kindle reader
  • Lucid Dreaming Beginner MP3 with isochronic tones (Binaural Beats) for lucid dream induction
    • This is the latest technology in Brainwave Entrainment
  • Bonus: Advanced Lucid Dreaming Techniques- weeks 3 and 4 include advanced techniques for lucid dreaming
  • Bonus: Lucid Dreaming Advanced MP3 with isochronic tones (Binaural Beats) for lucid dream induction
  • Bonus: Lucid Dreaming Cheat Sheet- keep this near your bed to review before you go to sleep

What can you expect after taking the course?

After you’ve read the manual, followed the daily exercises, listened to the MP3, used the cheat sheet, and followed the techniques persistently, soon enough you will:

  1. Have your first lucid dream. This is an important first step in learning to have lucid dreams on a consistent basis. You will likely be filled with excitement for several days after this, and want to have more lucid dreams.
  1. Begin having lucid dreams more frequently. People usually report having lucid dreams 10-15 times per month at this stage.
  1. Be able to have a lucid dream whenever you want. At this stage, you will be able to tell yourself the night before that you would like to have a lucid dream. And you will have a lucid dream that night, consistently.

The course is available on The Two Week Lucid Dreamer website.

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December 16th, 2010 No Comments

The Effect of Lucid Dreaming on Sleep Quality


Many lucid dreaming beginners are concerned about the potential negative effect lucid dreaming may have on their sleep quality. But is this concern unnecessary? Based on my own experiences, and lucid dreaming research, lucid dreaming provides the same quality of sleep as non-lucid. In both cases (lucid and non-lucid), a good dream can make you feel blissful and provide positive energy throughout your day, and a bad dream can make you feel tired and negative. The difference of lucid dreaming: You have control over your dreams when you are lucid, so you generally wake up happier and with more energy.

Lucid Dreaming Shows Similar Brain Activity to Non-Lucid Dreaming

Whether you are lucid (aware you’re dreaming) or not, you are still in REM sleep. Your brain has similar activity either way. There was an interesting study conducted on EEG activity during lucid dreaming that provides evidence of this. The study determined that “there were no important differences observed in the EEG activity of our LD signaller when LD REM and undisrupted, presumably nonlucid, REM samples were compared.”

Lucid Dreaming Techniques May Affect Sleep Quality

Lucid dreaming in itself does not have an effect on sleep quality. However, you may notice some grogginess if you are attempting new lucid dreaming techniques. Additionally, if you try too hard to have lucid dreams, you could lose sleep due to your excitement in anticipating a lucid dream before going to sleep. For example, when using the Wake Back to Bed (WBTB) technique, you wake up after 6 hours, stay up for 30-60 minutes, and go back to sleep. You may have trouble going back to sleep the first few times you try this technique. It may be better to save techniques like WBTB for the weekend, or days when you are able to sleep in later.

Sleep Supplements and REM Rebound

REM Rebound (Wikipedia definition): The lengthening and increasing frequency and depth of REM sleep which occurs after periods of sleep deprivation. When people are prevented from experiencing REM, they take less time to return to the REM state.

You can take a sleep supplement (Melatonin or 5-HTP) to suppress REM and increase the amount of time you are in “deep sleep” (N-REM) in your earlier sleep cycles. Then you can attempt your lucid dreaming during later sleep cycles. This will help you get better quality sleep earlier in the night, and increase the likelihood of lucidity in  later cycles due to a REM Rebound effect.

Poll Results about Sleep Quality and Lucid Dreaming

There was a poll conducted on Dream Views which asked “Is Lucid Dreaming affecting your sleep quality?” The results were that over 50% of lucid dreamers notice they are LESS tired the next day after lucid dreaming. So the lucid dreamers responding to the poll could either be getting better quality sleep, or are so excited about their lucid dream that it offsets any grogginess.

To learn more about lucid dreaming, sign up for your Free Lucid Dreaming Starter Handbook.

This post is part of the Dream Evolver Series

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December 13th, 2010 No Comments

Don’t Drink and Dream? Benefits and Drawbacks of Drinking Alcohol the Night Before Lucid Dreaming

O-Tooles Public House 2-5-09 4
If you have a few beers, glasses of wine, or mixed drinks one evening, how does this impact your sleep and dreams? Can you still have lucid dreams that night? This is a somewhat controversial subject, and reasonably so. There are benefits and drawbacks to drinking the evening before lucid dreaming. If you search the Dream Views forum, you will get mixed answers as to whether or not lucid dreaming can be combined with drinking alcohol.

The Main Drawbacks of Drinking Alcohol Before Lucid Dreaming

Reduced Dreaming and Dream Recall: Drinking reduces the amount of time spent in REM sleep, and the number of dreams you will be able to recall. Even if you wake up and recall your dreams, you may be too tired write them in your dream log.

Difficulty waking up: Drinking can make it more difficult to wake up to record your dreams or perform a lucid dreaming induction technique in the middle of the night. Upon waking, you are usually in a groggier state, and have less willpower than if you had slept sober.

Other negative side effects of drinking before sleep: Interference with “restorative deep sleep” (N-REM) and suppression of Melatonin, which is a hormone that helps regulate sleep.

The Main Benefit of Drinking Alcohol and Lucid Dreaming: Suppressing REM, Causing REM Rebound after it has worn off

REM Rebound (Wikipedia definition): The lengthening and increasing frequency and depth of REM sleep which occurs after periods of sleep deprivation. When people are prevented from experiencing REM, they take less time to return to the REM state.

If you have a chance to sleep in on the morning after you are drinking: You can take advantage of REM Rebound. What does this mean? Earlier in the night, when the alcohol is still in your system, you won’t have very much “dream sleep” (REM). After it has worn off, you will have much more longer and vivid dreams during your later REM sleep.

If you can’t sleep in on the morning after you are drinking: You probably won’t remember much of your dreams from that night, or experience lucid dreams. You may have some dream recall, but this depends on how much you drank, and how early in the evening you stopped drinking. Luckily, the next night, when you are sleeping sober, you will likely have a REM rebound effect. This will allow you to experience more dreams, and have greater chances of lucid dreaming.

My Experiences With Lucid Dreaming and Alcohol

I keep a detailed log of the food, drinks and supplements I consume before attempting lucid dreaming. For the majority of lucid dreams I have logged, I didn’t consume alcohol the night before. But I have logged some lucid dreams after drinking one or two alcoholic beverages the night before. For me, it seems that one to two drinks is okay, but more than that has had a negative impact on my dream recall and lucid dreaming. Additionally, if I am going to drink before lucid dreaming, I will try to drink earlier, so the REM Rebound has time to kick in.

To learn more about lucid dreaming, sign up for your Free Lucid Dreaming Starter Handbook.

This post is part of the Dream Evolver Series

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December 3rd, 2010 2 Comments

Wake-Initiated Lucid Dream (WILD): What to Expect During Your Transition to The Dream World

Transitioning from an awake, physical state to the dream world without breaking consciousness is one of the most strange and unique experiences you can have. For non-lucid dreamers, the transition happens after they have already lost consciousness, so they don’t remember it. For lucid dreamers, the transition to the dream world is one that they will never forget. To avoid confusion, here is an overview of the two types of lucid dreams.

Types of Lucid Dreams

Dream Initiated Lucid Dream (DILD): Starting in a dream, and becoming lucid while in your dream. This is the most common type of lucid dream. For most dreamers, this is the easiest type to initiate.

Wake Initiated Lucid Dream (WILD): Starting awake and conscious, and initiating a lucid dream without breaking your state of consciousness.

Hypnagogic Imagery

Wake-Initiated Lucid Dreams are sometimes referred to as an out of body experience or astral projection. WILD techniques are usually not successful at normal bedtime. The best time to practice these is in the late morning hours or during an afternoon nap. While WILDs are more difficult to induce than Dream-Initiated Lucid Dreams (DILDs) initially, once mastered, WILDs can be induced at will.

Sensations During a WILD Transition

It is difficult to put the waking transition to the lucid dream state into words. It is something you must experience for yourself. It is one of the most strange and unique experiences you will ever have. However, here are some common sensations you may have when transitioning to the dream state.

Sight:

  • Early part of transition: Hypnagogic imagery- random speckles, geometric shapes, bright light and images that a person sees as they are moving into a sleep state
  • Middle part of transition: Dream imagery starts to take shape. Dream images last longer and become more vivid.
  • Final part of transition: Dream imagery takes over your sense of sight. It’s as if a light came on.

Sound:

  • Early part of transition: Hypnagogic sounds- random sounds accompany hypnagogic imagery. Sometimes these can be very loud and alarming.
  • Middle part of transition: Sounds start to last longer and become audible. You may start to hear dream characters from the dream you are entering before seeing them.
  • Final part of transition: Sounds become fully audible. You are able to hear and understand sounds from the dream scene.

Feeling:

  • Early part of transition: Body parts begin to feel like they are floating, you begin to feel mild vibrations, and may experience a faster heartbeat
  • Middle part of transition: You start to identify more with your “floating” dream body instead of your physical body
  • Final part of transition: You start to feel intense vibrations, sudden acceleration. You identify fully with your dream body.

You will often go through several cycles of these. For example, if you get too excited or move your physical body as you initially start to transition to the dream world, you may stop experiencing these sensations and have to start over and let your body relax. After you relax for a while, you will experience these sensations again and have another chance to transition to the dream world.

Entering the Dream Scene

Here are the ways I have experienced entering the dream scene, from most-common to least-common:

  • Fast transition: Body has floating sensation and vibrations. Sudden brightness and transition to the dream scene. Take control of my dream body.
  • Slower transition: Body has floating sensation and vibrations. See hypnagogic imagery, brightness. Feel acceleration and finally enter the dream scene. Take control of my dream body.
  • Fast transition: Body has floating sensation and vibrations. Hear hypnagogic sounds first,  then sounds from dream, and transition to the dream scene. Take control of my dream body.

Different Types of Dream Scenes Entered

Here are the two types of dream scenes I usually enter:

  • Random dream location: Typically similar to a waking life location I have been to. I usually enter the scene laying on the ground in my dream body. These have been at outdoor locations more often than indoor.
  • Laying on bed in my apartment: Very realistic-looking apartment, similar to a false awakening (dream within a dream). The view is the same as if I’m sitting up in my bed. I see my body on the bed and step out of it (out of body experience).

Strange Experiences and Sleep Paralysis

You may have some other strange experiences during the transition due to sleep paralysis. For example, I had an experience of opening my physical eyes while still in my dream body (documented below).

Sleep paralysis: The American Psychological Association defines sleep paralysis as the “brief inability to move or speak just before falling asleep or on awakening… accompanied by hallucinations.”

Read my Review of Sleep Paralysis: A Dreamer’s Guide eBook by Ryan Hurd

I had a bizarre experience when I started to transition to the dream, and experienced sensations of sleep paralysis, but managed to open my real eyes. I was in my dream body, so I had the sensation of looking left and right in the dream environment, but my dream vision did not change. It was like I was looking at a picture. It was very bizarre. Here are some notes from that experience:

Woke up around 6 AM. Go back to bed. Feel vibrations and floating, signs that I was about to enter a dream. Thought I transitioned to my dream but saw darkness. I opened my eyes and saw an odd view of my room. It was a sideways view from me sleeping on my left side looking towards the window. I tried moving my head and looking around, but all I saw was a “picture” of that same view. I was in my dream body, but because my real eyes were open, I could not see the dream environment. After a few minutes of this, I woke up.

Looking back on this, I should have made an effort to close my physical eyes so I could fully enter the dream environment. But I was too confused at the time.

Your Experiences

What have your experiences been with transitions to wake-initiated lucid dreams / astral projection / out of body experiences? Add a comment or tweet to join the conversation.

Learn More

To learn more about lucid dreaming, sign up for your Free Lucid Dreaming Starter Handbook.

This post is part of the Dream Evolver Series

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December 1st, 2010 No Comments

Are You Sleepwalking Through Life? How Lucid Dreaming Can Lead to Living in the Present

Anon

If you spend the day spaced out and caught up in the elaborations of the conceptual mind, you are likely to do the same in dream. And if you are more present when awake, you will also find that presence in dream.

-Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep

A lucid dream is a dream in which you are aware that you are dreaming. There are many reasons people decide to try lucid dreaming. Here are a few of the more popular reasons:

  • Fun (ex. flying, superhero abilities)
  • Treatment for nightmares
  • Rehearsing an activity for your waking life (ex. sport, musical performance)
  • Self knowledge and personal growth

These are all great reasons, but most dreamers have not considered another positive side effect to lucid dreaming. When you become lucid within a dream, you practice living in the moment and maintaining awareness of your dream state. If you let your thought patterns slip into autopilot mode in a lucid dream, you will likely forget that you are dreaming and lose lucidity. Early lucid dreamers often lose lucidity or get excited and wake up from the dream. But experienced lucid dreamers learn to maintain awareness in the dream.

Taking Advantage of Your Senses in Waking Life

Somewhere along my lucid dreaming journey, I started to notice a lot more around me than before in my waking life. Before lucid dreaming, my waking life thoughts and tasks would be leave me in autopilot mode more frequently. I would be stuck deep in thought, not taking advantage of my senses, not enjoying the moment and my external environment.

As it is, I would say about 80 to 90 percent of most people’s thinking is not only repetitive and useless, but because of its dysfunctional and often negative nature, much of it is also harmful. Observe your mind and you will find this to be true. It causes a serious leakage of vital energy.

-Eckhart Tolle, The Power of Now

What I Learned about Lucid Dreaming and Living in the Present

The lucid dreaming habit of maintaining awareness in the dream state seems to flow into waking life. Lucid dreaming foundational practices helped me become more conscious in waking life initially. For example, performing reality checks (asking myself “Am I dreaming?”) throughout the day initially led to more consciousness of the present. Also, practicing dream yoga techniques such as “recognizing the dream-like nature of life” helped. But overall, experiencing lucid dreams and prolonging the dreams by maintaining awareness has made the biggest impact.

Just as your habits you have in waking life are reflected in your dream world, the reverse is also true. The habits you develop in your dream world are reflected in your waking life.

Learn More About Lucid Dreaming

To learn more about lucid dreaming, sign up for your Free Lucid Dreaming Starter Handbook.

This post is part of the Dream Evolver Series

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